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accepting the 2014 moth award, zadie smith shared her experience/views on the art form of storytelling. watch her speech above (transcript below via medium.com) and let me know what you think:

Unlike the many talented storytellers here this evening, I can’t tell a tale unless it’s written down. Actually, until very recently I would not have called myself much of a storyteller at all — out of respect for the term. A storyteller was someone with a generative, unlimited imagination, the kind of person who makes worlds: someone like CS Lewis, say, or Ursula K Le Guin. Imagine a world in a wardrobe or a planet in which gender is not a fixed state but a condition, changing season by season. Those are stories. My own writing seemed to me more prosaic. I don’t make up marvelous tales. I only try to express — as clearly as possible — the thoughts and feelings many people have. Often my subjects are the simplest things in the world: joy, family, the weather, houses, streets. Nothing fancy. And when I sit down with these subjects my aim is clarity. I’m really trying to clear some of the muddle from my own brain — my brain being a very muddled place indeed. Sometimes I think my whole professional life has been based on this hunch I had, early on, that many people feel just as muddled as I do, and might be happy to tag along with me on this search for clarity, for precision. I love that aspect of writing. Nothing makes me happier than to hear a reader say: that’s just what I’ve always felt, but you said it clearly. I feel then that I’ve achieved something useful. But that has often seemed far away from real story-telling, and in truth there have been times over the past decade when I have felt quite distant from stories and unsure how to tell them. I forgot — as the rappers like to say — why I got into this game in the first place.

Then I had kids. But what a boring story: “Then I had kids.” Still, I have to be truthful. And the truth is something happened when I had kids. I went from not being able to think of a single story to being unable to stop seeing stories pretty much every place I looked. Now, before anybody raises a hand to object, I am not a biological essentialist, nor one of these people who believe a gift for empathy arrives along with the placenta. The explanation, in my opinion, is less dramatic: storybooks. For the first time since childhood I am back in the realm of stories and storybooks — three stories read out loud to a four year old, every night, on pain of death — and this practice has reawakened in me something I thought I’d misplaced a long time ago, on book tour, perhaps, or in the back row of a university lecture hall. This feeling of narrative possibility and wonder — this idea that every person is a world. How could I have forgotten that? Did I really almost drift away, down that anemic, intellectual path where storytelling is considered vulgar and characters a stain on the purity of a sentence? Dear Lord — almost. I’m so grateful now to have the opportunity to reacquaint myself with stories like The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl. I lie in bed with my daughter, reading aloud this Kafkaesque tale of a family of duck hunters, who wake up one morning with wings where their arms should be, and it sends me back to my desk with an ease and fluidity I haven’t felt since my own childhood.

Which is all to say this lovely award has come at the right moment, just when I find myself falling back in love with stories and appreciating anew what an unprecedented privilege it is to make your living telling them. The unlikeliest story of my life is the one about the girl from Willesden who found readers in the United States, and not a little of the credit for that is due to my good friend — and one-time publicist — Kimberly Burns, who is here tonight. Thank you. And thanks to everyone at The Moth for giving me an opportunity to use this stage to say thank you in person to some of my American readers, for their unexpected generosity, for the gift of their attention and time.

Now, I have one more person to thank, but before that I want to tell a short story concerning my first conscious experience of story-telling. I think when it’s done you may better understand the root of my conflicted feelings toward the form. Here goes:

Once upon a time, I was nine. It was summer in England, the sky was blue but also full of clouds. I was not — how can I put this — overburdened with friends. It was warm, but school was still in session, and this presented the insolvable problem of break time, for there is only so long you can walk around a playground pretending to be looking for your playmates. To hide my isolation, I spent a lot of time looking at the clouds, and at a strange ivy-covered tower that stood next door to our school. In the attic of that building, I decided, a tragic young woman lived, the prisoner of a God who did not want this girl to marry her true love, Superman. It didn’t make sense, but it was a story, and I got good at telling it. In order to draw attention to myself, I started telling it to kids in the playground. It grew more elaborate each time I told it, and I always finished up by swearing on my mother’s life. I swear! I swear there’s a young woman up there, and she’s sending smoke signals into the sky — in the shape of clouds — so when you see one that looks like superman, put a tac in your shoe. The more people with tacs in their shoe, the louder it will sound when you walk, and the louder it sounds when you walk, the — Oh, I don’t remember. There must have been a logic to it, but I can’t recall now what it was. Anyway the takeaway was: tac in the shoe. I was hell bent on this tac-in-the-shoe business. You’ve got to put a tac in your shoe or the poor girl will die! It’s true! I swear on my mother’s life! It’s a miracle my mother survived that summer.

Well, people seemed to be into my story, everyone seemed into it, really, all except this one girl — her name was Anupma — who proved to be a sceptic. She was very smart, Anupma — that was part of the problem. She was not moved by rhetoric. She had a fundamental logical issue with the smoke signals/clouds/superman trifecta. And one day, apropos of nothing at all — she turned to me in the playing fields and said: “That story isn’t true. It’s a lie. And I’m going to tell everyone.” And she started to run towards our classrooms. Watching her go, I experienced the ten-year-old version of acute despair. Everything I’d built, all my new friends, indeed, my sense of my own value — all of it seemed dependent on this ridiculous story, and she was threatening to reveal it for what it was: a lie. I had to stop her from reaching that classroom. I ran after her. She was fast — it wasn’t easy. But just by the sandpit, I put my leg in front of hers like an Italian footballer and dragged her violently to the ground, where her knee promptly split open and bled all over the concrete. Crying, filthy, she lay defeated on the floor, and the look she gave me I have never forgotten. It was a horrified question: What kind of a person is this? The nurse came; Anupma was taken to the medical room to be patched up, and as far as I know she did not rat on me, neither concerning my lies nor my casual brutality. At least, I was allowed to pass unmolested on to class. I caught up with my classmates in the hall. “What is that noise?” asked the teacher as we shuffled into class. Tap tap tap. It took me a second to recognize it myself. Tacs in every shoe.

Tonight my husband is here, and he has heard that story many times. Having known each other 20 years there isn’t a story of mine he hasn’t heard many times and vice versa. He rolls his eyes at this one in particular because of the mix of humble-brag and pure ruthlessness it displays — but he’s a storyteller, too, and I think he knows what I mean by telling it. Storytelling is a magical, ruthless discipline. The people who tell stories are often tempted to create a hierarchy in their lives, in which stories come before everything else, including people. Part of my anxiety about storytelling is an awareness of that monomaniacal part of me that is willing to wrestle a little girl to the ground in order to preserve the integrity of a story. I know that part of me exists, but I really try to suppress it, because I want to find an accommodation between telling stories about life and living it well. In this accommodation, no one and no story can compare with Nick, who is every bit as ruthlessly dedicated to writing as I am, but who has besides a capacity for love and kindness that I know I will spend my lifetime trying to equal. Without you, I would not be telling stories all — I’d just be kicking little girls in the face. The luckiest thing that happened to me — besides becoming a professional storyteller — is marrying one, and as I don’t often get a chance to say thank you publically, I wanted to do so now. Thank you.

related: zadie smith on “creativity and refusal” | the most splendiferous 7 minutes of your day

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“storytelling is a magical, ruthless discipline”

05/17/14 1 Comment

leftovers

08/31/13 2 Comments

leftovers4

often times in portraits, faces are the center of attention.  this photo series however takes away that center literally and pushes your attention elsewhere.  details via nytimes:

Visiting the town of Gulu in northern Uganda, the Italian photographer Martina Bacigalupo happened upon discarded portraits with the subjects’ faces removed. They led her to the Gulu Real Art Studio, where Obal Denis sold ID photos by cutting rectangles out of larger prints. Bacigalupo gathered Denis’s scraps and interviewed his customers. Many had been affected by the war in northern Uganda, which lasted some two decades. Taken for driver’s licenses, new job and loan applications, the photos were the means for Ugandans to start new chapters in their lives. The “leftovers,” as Bacigalupo calls the images — showing at the Walther Collection Project Space in New York next month — evoke in her mind both the “agony of an entire community” and its resilience.

you can check out some of the series in the gallery below.  as you do, see if you can glean each subject’s backstory from details like clothing & body language.  also, try to imagine the face that belongs in the blank space.   for more, be on the lookout for bacigalupo’s upcoming book “gulu real art studio”.

here’s a modern take on home building, spiced with ingenuity, persistence & brooklyn.  background via science friday:

Michele Bertomen and David Boyle bought an empty 20-by-40-foot lot in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. They planned to build something traditional, but when the bid for the masonary envelope (the building without plumbing, electricity) came back at over $300,000, they re-evaluated. Inspired by Bertomen’s students at New York Institute of Technology, the couple decided to try building their home from shipping containers–which cost them about $50,000 for the building envelope.  Bertomen, an architect, and Boyle, the general contractor, designed and oversaw construction of their home. We stopped by for a tour.

what do you think about michele & david’s home?  would you ever live in a building made with shipping containers or any other unusual material?

spotted @ npr’s fresh air.

related: 20 unusual homes from around the world | 14 exciting architectural moments in 2012

living inside the box

08/15/13 1 Comment

surreal images by erik johansson

07/24/13 3 Comments

"Self-actualization" - "It was shot in mid October 2011 just before the winter arrived. In short he was shot in front of a white canvas in all natural light with Swedish Värnen as a backdrop. I could have done the painting in Photoshop but wanted to keep it as realistic as possible so I did it by hand and shot the canvas from the same angle about a week later. See video below:" http://youtu.be/5mZjz5U-7tY

photographer/retouch artist erik johansson says that he uses photography as “a way of collecting material to realize the ideas in my mind.”  see how he brings some of those ideas to life in the gallery below (click for a closer look).  spotted on soul pancake.

related: it was all a dream | dali in wonderland

a thumbprint portrait colored with your favorite things

06/11/13 1 Comment

DSC05613

details via artist cheryl sorg:

Thumbprint portraits use your own thumbprint to create a large (three feet high!), modern, colorful work of art that will be absolutely YOU.  I will use your own thumbprint and recreate its unique patterns using snippets of imagery, text and color from your favorite things (you’ll provide a list and I’ll pore through and gather hundreds of images to best represent that list).  Your favorites could include much-loved books, music, films, poetry, quotes, places traveled and lived and more.  The result is a truly one-of-a-kind portrait that captures your personality and passions.  It makes a wonderful gift for yourself or a loved one.  A great way to do a unique family portrait – you could create one for each family member, or (like the one shown above!) use one family member’s thumbprint and incorporate the interests of all family members into one portrait.

take a close look at the portraits in the gallery below.  think about what you might include your portrait (you can buy one here) and share in the comments.  to help you along, listen to “my favorite things” by john coltrane.

the coolest resignation letter ever?

04/23/13 2 Comments

tumblr_mlnz3ixrqj1qa79lmo1_500 copywriter nino gupana left the ad agency leo burnett with class and a personalized bottle of jack daniel’s.  spotted on hyc.

update…nino reached out and provided some background on the bottle:

I came up with an idea to give my resignation letter a little twist as I am dead nervous to approach my Chief Creative Officer Raoul Panes. Everyone knows in the office that Jack Daniel’s is my favorite drink so I decided to play with its iconic design and typography. When I handed it out to my boss, he didn’t notice the texts in the bottle. He thought that it was just a post-Christmas gift. Then I told him to read the label. He was surprised. Then there, we talked about the serious matter. We talked about the whys, whens, wheres and hows. Before I left the room after the talk, I blurted out, “Sir, one for the road.” So there, I think my anxiety mellowed down and the mood lightened up a bit because of the bottle of Jack.
bonus: here’s another contender for the title.

31 days of creativity with food

04/17/13 1 Comment

artist/architect hong yi (aka “red”) challenged herself to create new art every day in march using only food:

My ‘creativity with food’ series has helped me push the limits of my creativity by forcing me to churn out new designs every day. It has taught me to not be too serious about what I do, but also to pay attention to detail and to work within the confines of a very small area. I’ve learned to slice, dice, stir, boil…who would have thought I’d need that for my art! 

This has definitely been a very refreshing and fun exercise that is very different from what I’ve done before. It’s made me more observant of the food I come across each day; I don’t just shove them done my throat anymore…I notice their texture and patterns, the way they crack or fold or crumble, and how they react when in contact with heat or moisture or air…It has taught me to see joy and fun in ordinary, everyday items that I come across, and to paint and create objects as I feel and imagine them, not just as I see them.

check out some of my favorites from the series below (click on them for a closer look + red’s captions).  for more, go to her instagram or blog.  spotted at colossal.

related: see the alphabet sculpted into crayola crayons | the banana is but a canvas to our imagination

see the alphabet sculpted into crayola crayons

04/04/13 2 Comments

z is for zebra

z is for zebra

crayons are one of the first tools given to us to create art.  diem chau flipped things a bit by making art out of the tool itself.  chau sculpted the alphabet into a collection of crayola crayons.  she also paired each letter up with a vivid example (“a is for armadillo”, “h is for handstand”, etc.).  click on the pics for captions and for a better look at her intricate work.  via colossal.

(for a soundtrack to your pic browsing, here’s india arie & elmo singing the alphabet song):

related: the banana is but a canvas to our imagination

the uk’s channel 4 challenged people “to shoot a factual narrative within a day following ‘A Day in the Life’ of someone.”  director jeremy cole responded by helping young (“six & a three-quarters” to be exact) shyheim foster describe his stepdad’s daily grind.  check it out above (my childhood loves the superhero “s”).

my challenge to you: describe a day in the life of someone who you’re close with and have that person do the same for you.  share with each other & analyze any discrepancies between perception and reality.

related: the most splendiferous 7 minutes of your day | wasp | exploring black fatherhood

a day in the life of my stepdad

03/20/13

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